S2.21 The Parasite and the Widow

The Parasite and the Widow by Jeremy Gottwig


Jeremy’s recent work has appeared in Nature: Futures, the InterGalactic Medicine Show, and Darkfuse.  He lives in Baltimore, MD with his wife and young son and is a member of the Baltimore Science Fiction Society Critique Circle.

Links:
Strange Shuttle
@jgottwig
Facebook

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You can support 600 Second Saga by giving us a 5-star review on iTunes.

S2.20 Please Wash Your Hands

Please Wash Your Hands by Keith P Graham

Keith P. Graham is a Beekeeper, Computer Programmer, Blues Harp Player, and Science Fiction Lover. He has worked for IBM, Verizon, and Lockheed Martin where, among many other things, he wrote a large part of the original EZ-Pass system for automated highways.

Keith is the webmaster for one of the largest and oldest Blues Harmonica related sites on the internet: www.jt30.com. He is the author of the ancient Science Fiction site: www.cthreepo.com.

He has been reading Science Fiction since the early 1960’s and even has some stories he wrote back then.  Now retired, Keith is finally having time to write Science Fiction and Fantasy. He has sold about four dozen stories. He lives in New York State with five obnoxious cats and Erica.

Music is provided by MADS.

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Brain Capacity: Where are you spending yours?

I’ve had a couple of really good chats with friends this weekend. Thinking about brain capacity, what you spend your brain energy on, wearing it down, and being short on capacity.

I kind of having been letting that shift around in my head a little and based on some of those conversations, here are my thoughts.

I have several different kinds of brain capacity and different things spend down different buckets.

Organizational/details:

This is the stuff that is the focused details, the checklists, the tools. For me this is something I spend down fairly quickly when I’m overwhelmed. I do ok when I have the same project or I know the work and just loop through and am repeating it. When I’m trying to come up with a new organizational plan it’s much more creative than organizational for me. But once I’m settled in, it’s just a matter of following through, which I’m great at when I’m not spending down my energy on other things. (I’ve had a couple of spates of this being really hard for me this year, when I was really sick for over a month, and when I had the Giant Person Eating Work Project. I was a mess.)

For podcasting there was a lot of creating a new plan and coming up with the structure in the month before and the 6 months or so after I started the podcast, but by that point I was settled into a routine and I’m feeling pretty good about it. I have shifted things up a bit here and there and I have a couple more shifts I’d like to make, but they are fairly small, and my routine feels comfortable and like it’s mostly accomplishing what I want.

For writing it’s still a really big challenge on the front and back ends. The middles I’m good with, and the short works I’m ok with. But the start and end of novels or novellas and the organization, planning, and structure that goes into those is rough. I have a novella I’m supposed to be working on putting out this fall and I’m just…exhausting thinking about it. I have no idea how I’m going to manage it.

Humaning

Oooof. This is…hard. Just hard. It’s such a challenge for me, and the thing I always feel like I’m worst at. It’s also the most important when I’m stressed about other things so that makes it more of a challenge.

When I started the podcast I was at a really good humaning place at work which I think let me feel comfortable starting it out. I was surprised by the amount of humaning podcasting required, but I think that I am an underestimator of how much work it takes me to do. Meeting new people, reaching out, having new conversations, traveling uncharted waters.

Writing I don’t human as much, still more than ideally, but I think much, much less than I need to to really be successful.

And here’s the kicker. In the last couple months at my day job I’ve been moving into work that is basically entirely humaning. (It’s good and I’m excited, but for right now…) It’s exhausting. I need to learn a whole new set of people, how they react, what sets them off, what makes them gleeful, what pisses them off. What to do when I have to ask a favor. What to do when I screw up. And what to expect from them. When someone asks me a question, is it going to make me grind my teeth or will it be a whole lot of something for a 2 second answer.

Creative

This isn’t just writing, this is creative problem solving, this is creative thoughts about a project, this is trying to develop something new. Writing is a corner stone of this for me. And it is something that I was doing when my day to day work was less creative. I’ve had jobs that have had a ton of creativity in them. Not writing fiction. But there is a lot of creativity beyond that out there. But when I’ve been satisfied at my jobs, but not quite so challenged creatively, writing has been a great opportunity for me. I don’t think that I want to seek out jobs that don’t challenge me creatively simply in order to write, but I think that it is a internal conversation worth having. At this time and place in my life the answer to that is no. But that doesn’t mean it won’t change. I could very well some day decide that what I want is a quiet job I can do peacefully without strain for 8 hours a day and go home and be incredibly creative.

The day job is taking a lot more of my creative brain. When I’m letting my mind wander at 3 am it is more often wandering to work projects than wandering off into outer space. I’m thinking about how to resolve an issue with work instead of with a character. It’s left me feeling a little like I’m bad at being creative, but I don’t think that’s it at all, I think it’s just different. It’s not that I’m not good at thinking about the world differently, it’s that I’m applying those skills to a different problem in my life.

Technical

This might not be the perfect way to talk about this. And it isn’t exclusively technical as in computers and such. It is technical as in the meat and potatoes of the work I’m doing. If it’s writing it’s stuff like how well structured is this plot. Have I done a good job of developing all of my characters. For writing this might include things like creating character bios for all of my characters as well as just the put my damn pen to the damn paper (or my fingers on the keyboard) and write. For work this would be the actual every day work. The digging in and doing it.

Technical seems like the bucket that is most easily replenished. It is also the thing that I can most easily OOMPH my way through if I just need to dig in and get shit done. If that’s writing it’s on day 25 of NaNo still sitting down at the keyboard and typing even though I don’t feel like it. It is following the plan and structure that I already have based on the creative skills and the planning I did. If there’s an outline of what to do, technical is following it through.

Technical isn’t bad at all. It is something I am extremely proud of. Technical is what turns someone from a dreamer into an author. Technical is what makes an “ideas person” into a leader. Technical is doing the damn work. And if you aren’t doing the damn work and you’re just talking about it?

(Thank you Meg from Indoorswomen (which is awesome) for being the Gif Queen!)

I’m mostly just sharing this because I think it can be really helpful to examine where you are (where I am!) and what skills you are flexing or using. Right now I’m using a lot of Creative and Humaning at work and I’m leaning on my Technical for podcasting (which makes me feel really good about the podcast, about being a podcaster, and about podcasting, all forms of that word!).

 

What are your brain capacity buckets? What do you use? Lean on? Flail with? Other?

S2.19 Petty Gremlins

Petty Gremlins by Kurt Pankau


Kurt Pankau is a software developer in St. Louis, Missouri. Kurt has a weakness for stories about time-travel. His flash fiction has previously appeared in Daily Science Fiction and been produced for Wisconsin Public Radio.
Read more from Kurt on Twitter @KurtPankau.

Music is provided by MADS.

You can support 600 Second Saga by giving us a 5-star review on iTunes.

Take a listen and a question

I would encourage you all to check out the #2podsaday campaign. #2PodsADay – Listen More, Listen Indie. Some really interesting podcasts (and I’ll be coming up at some point this month too!)

I had a wonderful podcast with Linda at Poetry Ponderings Podcast about the power of poetry, flash fiction, and trusting the reader. Plus a bonus short from the Smoke Jumper World.Poetry Ponderings Podcast: PPP # 012 Deep in the Woods with Mariah Avix

Finally a question for you…

How do you keep track of …why you made the decisions to cut something/add something? Do you? Do you assume you’ll remember? Do you remember? Do you ever try something you’ve already tried that didn’t work and then had to throw it out again?

S2.18 Walls of Nigeria

Walls of Nigeria by Jeremy Szal


Originally published in Nature.

Jeremy Szal was born in 1995 in the outback of Australia and was raised by wild dingoes. His science-fiction and fantasy work has appeared in Nature, Abyss & Apex, Lightspeed, Strange Horizons, Tor.com, The Drabblecast, and has been translated into multiple languages. He is the fiction editor for Hugo-winning podcast StarShipSofa where he’s worked with authors such as George R. R. Martin, William Gibson, and Joe R. Lansdale. He’s completed multiple novels and is on the hunt for literary representation. He carves out a living in Sydney, Australia, where he consumes too much beer. Find him at http://jeremyszal.com/ or @JeremySzal

Music is provided by MADS.

You can support 600 Second Saga by giving us a 5-star review on iTunes.

Turn of Phrases

I’ve been thinking a lot about the twisted phrases, idioms, metaphors, similies and the like that we use. In writing and in day to day language. (Translation and plain language guidelines ooof!)

I’ve been listening to a phenomenal new podcast Turn of Phrases. The most recent episode addressed my question about “a bridge too far” which …I have probabally been using too much lately. But in my defense there are a LOT of things that are a bridge too far!

Old wives tales

When you write non-modern things do you go out of your way to find older idioms and phrases? Do you seek out, or create your own phrases? I have tried to here and there. But it does make the writing both more immersive and sometimes much harder to read. But then the question is are you basically writing using current modern terms to describe something that is in a forgien language? I write in English, but what I write would be completely unintelligable to someone 500 years ago. And not just because I make up words, though that doesn’t help. So I fully expect it will be the same in 500 years in the future. Or maybe less. (I’m just making up the 500 years number.)

S2.17 Distance

Distance by Soar

Distance was narrated by Soar

Soar is an international poet and storyteller living in Berlin, author of four books on the themes of love, human values, life and positive thinking. Currently a new book and a vinyl are in development, under the project “Poetry-in-Motion”, by ©Soar.

The author is a member of the Society of Authors (UK), Poets&Writers (USA) and collaborates with international magazines in Germany, Italy, UK, Romania and the US (Decanto The Poetry Magazine, Enigma, Lastbench, Flash Literary Journal, Women Move the Soul, Indie Spirit Magazine, Märkische Allgemeine, BW Polyglott – BDÜ Magazine, Schwäbische Zeitung, Woman@Work Magazine, The Munich Eye, The Berlin Eye, Terpress Urbana, Confluente literare). She also organizes the yearly charity event “Love for UNICEF”, where every downloaded book/poem/story at the end of each year goes to the benefit of “Child Survival and Development Program“.

Soar graduated from the universities in Romania, France and Germany and she finished her master studies in International Relations in The United Kingdom. She lectures and performs to various artistic events in Germany, Austria and Switzerland.

Further enquiries and booking for interviews, readings, artistic events:

www.soaring-words.com  
info@soaring-words.com

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Writing Prompt: Unusual Were-Animals

I love werewolves and the other very common variations. But I also think there is a lot of other under explored were-animals.

My Smokejumpers series explores a few of these, peregrine falcons (my favorite), jaguars (pretty common), mountain lions (also on the not unusual list), stags and much more. What is the most unusual shifter you’ve read? Written? What would you like to read?

I’ve been listening to the Varmints podcast and I’ve been thinking about which of these would make good shape shifters.

Varmints!

2.16 Basilisk on a Yellow Field

Basilisk on a Yellow Field by Jon Cronshaw


Jon Cronshaw is a UK-based science fiction and fantasy author. He has published three short story collections, Host, The Gibson Continuum, and Her Name Was Red.

His debut novel Wizard of the Wasteland is out now. He has a PhD in the history of art and has seen his writing published in regional and national newspapers across the UK, including the Metro and Guardian.

He’s an ex-gamer, a guide dog owner, a voracious reader, and a certified geek.

www.joncronshaw.com
Facebook
Twitter: @jlcronshaw

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