See, smell, hear

I love thinking, but most of these links are more tangible. How we see, smell, hear, and interact with the world around us. Or the world a forever ago. That one is pretty to look at too.

Yarnbombing!

Fantastically beautiful and cool projects. I’ve seen some of these in my city. I’ve never done one myself, but I have absolutely considered it.

Smell tourney

What smell would win in your world? I like the smell of thunderstorms and campfires a lot. Though enemy’s tears? Hm…I think maybe I haven’t smelled enough of those. Is that good or bad? What would win in your tournament of smells?

Nightmare Monster IRL

And it needed that weird-ass eye arrangement to see what it was doing at the end of its mouth proboscis. Once again, science has helped us understand the origins of nightmare fuel in evolutionary history.

I don’t think it is a monster. But it is super cool, and it is amazing that we still manage to continue to uncover new things about very…very old species.

From Nature

see, smell, hear ancient monsters
Cool and terrifying images

Australian Fairy Circles

Similar things in different areas, might have different reasons or similar ones. But the more fairy circles they can find and compare, the better. Off to google earth! (I would have sworn I saw about five since I read this article. Not really, but it is still very cool.)

Sleep tools

Each word or phrase is very different from the previous one. It might get you to imagine a pear, a lamp shade, a rock, fishing, trying on hats, skiing, whatever. This is meant to imitate and induce the first stage of sleep (“N1″), where your mind drifts from one “random” thing to another.

This is a fascinating tool. I’ve used it a few days and I’m not entirely sure how I feel about it. I love that there is science behind it. Worth trying if you have trouble falling asleep.

2 thoughts on “See, smell, hear

  1. I have never heard of yarn bombing. Very cool. I love how it brings awareness in a kind way, and that the project can then be used for good again by giving blankets to those in need.

    1. Every winter someone (or multiple someones) put out boxes with scarves and mittens for people who need them in the places they frequent. A similar kind of knitting kindness.

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